Shannon's Watershed Blog Page

Fecal Coliforms and Turbidity
5/24/17


For the past two weeks my class has been studying fecal coliforms and turbidity. Fecal coliforms and turbidity are important to a body of water so that you know that it is safe to do everyday activities with the water. The ecosystem can start warming up, or cooling down and grow different types of bacteria.

If the temperature was to warm up, then there would very little dissolved oxygen and if the water were to get ice cold, then there would be a lot of dissolved oxygen. If there is too much or too little dissolved oxygen then the plants and animals will die, and bacteria will eat the extra dissolved oxygen, the balance would have also been tampered with.

Increased plant growth can make the water colder than there would be an overwhelming amount of dissolved oxygen, then the bacteria will spread, because the bacteria will eat the extra dissolved oxygen. Increased plant growth could also block the sunlight , so the water won’t be warm, instead it will get colder.

If there was too much dissolved oxygen the plants will become bigger and die, and the water will get colder, so any fish and plants that need warm water will die or try to find a new home. After the water gets cold the balance would be tampered with.

Thermal pollution is when is when the water is too cold or too warm and the temperature is increasing and decreasing, and the amount of dissolved oxygen also increases and decreases.

If the water is too cold then or to warm it could mean there’s not a lot of different fish and plants in the water, because certain plants and fish need warm water and others need cold water, but if there is a perfect temperature than the balance is equal.

If the water is clear it means it can be healthy, but if the water is turbid that could mean there is a lot of bacteria in the water, and it could be unhealthy to swim or do other daily activities in the body of water.

Some causes of turbid water could be from erosion, which occurs when water carries dirt into the body of water, because the grass roots are long enough to hold the dirt in place. Another way turbid water is caused could be from fecal coliforms which are from sewage discharge, or also know as waste or sewage.

If there is a high level of bacteria it could mean there is a lot of fecal coliforms in the water, or if there is a small amount of bacteria it could mean there is not a lot of fecal coliforms in the body of water.

Fecal coliforms happen when there is a sewage discharge in the water, which mean sewage is dumped into the water by a sewage overflow.

When we create pipes that dumps sewage into the water, or farms on the edge of a body of water we can create temperature change which causes bacteria to overrun the body of water, and it can also upset the balance.

This is what my class has been learning in science for the past week or two during science.
Filter Reflection
5-3-17


Designing filters were fun and taught me how to design filters that can purify water, because purifying water is important, so you can stay healthy and safe and help the environment. I also learned that there is many things that you need purified water for, like baths, drinking water, and etc.

My ideal filter would be a screen, paper filter, and miniature beads, because the paper filter would get all the big particles and some of the small ones, then the beads will get out the rest of the small particles. The screen will get the giant particles, so the paper filter, and the miniature beads won’t get clogged from the huge particles.

I think time, because the more time it takes the cleaner the water would be, and the only thing we don’t have in the world is time. With time we can purify the polluted water. Also over time you can save up to get a better filter.

Also, I predicted that the coffee filters would rip apart when the dirt and water weighed it down, but it would get out most of the particles out. The screen would probably not get all the particles out. Using the sand and gravel would make the water dirtier, because it would fall into the water that is getting purified.

Inquiry Set Up
12/16/16

In my class we are working on growing duckweed with watery fertilizer. I will tell you how to set the experiment up in case you want to do it. What you will need for the inquiry is, four small test tubes, water, duckweed plants, and one bigger test tube, fertilizer that is liquid, eye droppers, and a hand lens or a magnifying glass.

The first step of the procedure is, add 10 milligrams of water to each of the four test tubes. Step two, add two small drops of liquid fertilizer to the test tubes. Next, add four duckweed to the test tubes. Make sure their all in the water and not stuck to the sides of the test tubes. The fourth step is, count all of the fronds, even the new ones. The fifth step is, label the test tubes with the number of fronds there is. The next step is, put the test tubes where they will get enough light. The final step is, record data every day, and count newly grown fronds.

Phosphorus Investigation
12/6/16

My class has previously started a new unit about what too much phosphorus can do to any body of water and the ecosystem that inhabits it. I have a few claims about this investigation, but the question I will be answering is, “Where does all the phosphorus in the lake come from. Phosphorus in the lake comes from farms and forest lands. Things you use or see are made out of phosphorus like, fertilizer for crops, or maybe even plates or china. Some of these things are made out of phosphorus.

Phosphorus atomic mass is 30.97, and the atomic number is 15. Phosphorus is one of the many elements in the world. Also Phosphorus is good for the environment, but if there is too much it can reduce the amount of dissolved oxygen there is in a body of water.
Dissolve Oxygen Investigation
11/21/16

When my class and the other 5/6 grade class came together to do our science experiment we made several conclusions about the two water samples from the guppies tank and Cedar Lake. We discovered when we added the manganous sulfate and the iodide-azide the water started developing flocculate or floc.The sample from the guppy tank turned a lighter yellow than the Cedar Lake sample.

The sample from Cedar Lake turned foggy and almost appeared as the color of rust. Next we added sulfamic acid. The sulfamic acid appeared to be dissolving the flocculate also know as floc. The last chemical we added two the samples was sodium thiosulfate.The sodium thiosulfate made the water samples appear clear again. It took 14 drops of the sodium thiosulfate to make the Cedar lake sample clear again, and it took nine drops to make the guppy tank sample clean again.

We found out the Cedar Lake sample had When my class and the other 5/6 grade class came together to do our science experiment we made several conclusions about the two water samples from the guppies tank and Cedar Lake. We discovered when we added the manganous sulfate and the iodide-azide the water started developing flocculate or floc.The sample from the guppy tank turned a lighter yellow than the Cedar Lake sample. The sample from Cedar Lake turned foggy and almost appeared as the color of rust. Next we added sulfamic acid. The sulfamic acid appeared to be dissolving the flocculate also know as floc. The last chemical we added two the samples was sodium thiosulfate.The sodium thiosulfate made the water samples appear clear again. It took 14 drops of the sodium thiosulfate to make the Cedar lake sample clear again, and it took nine drops to make the guppy tank sample clean again. We found out the Cedar Lake sample and the guppy sample had very little oxygen, so they can’t support a healthy ecosystem. That’s why there is several different types of fish in Cedar Lake who can live with little oxygen.


10/26/16

Over the weekend, I have seen Non-point source/point source pollutants and Land and water interacting.
An example of a Non-point source pollutant I have seen is when someone in my house flushes the toilet and it goes into a sewage drain, then people put it underground where ground water can carry it into a body of water.
The chicken/ duck waste from my chickens and ducks at my house can be carried by water and go into a lake, river, pond, ect.
Also, a land and water interacting thing I saw happen was I saw a bunch of water hit the dirt and turn into a mud puddle and the next day I looked at it, it was a little hole in the ground because the muddy water got absorbed into the ground causing a hole.
Also, next to my house one of my neighbors have two horses that go to the bathroom all the time. The hoarse waste could be carried through water like a hitch hiker and go into a body of water, and it ends up polluting it.
This is my blog about Non-point/ point source pollutants and water/land interacting.
10/14/16
Science Blog

What we have been working on for nearly a month is, we studied, “How does water quality affect the ecology of a community .” Some of the things we learned is about runoff, groundwater, and nonpoint sources and point sources pollutants.

The question we were working on for our last unit was, “How does land and water interact in a community.” Our lesson we have started recently is about nonpoint sources and point source pollutants. A point source would be if you saw someone throwing trash on the ground, or if you saw someone pouring chemicals down a storm drain. A nonpoint source would be if you saw trash on the ground you wouldn’t know who did it, or if you saw oil, or other pollutants in a lake you wouldn’t know who did it or when they did. That is some of the things we did for science this month.

#ShannonCreatedThis #Pollutants #Science



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